36 years in business: Mark Zweig’s 12 bits of advice

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The weekly Zweig eNEWS is a worthy addition to your reading list.
The weekly Zweig eNEWS is a worthy addition to your reading list.
The weekly Zweig eNEWS is a worthy addition to your reading list.

In the last post, I shared some “words of wisdom” gathered from 28 years in business. However, Mark Zweig, founder and CEO of the Zweig Group, has done far better — and lasted at least eight years longer — than me, so his advice carries greater weight. I’ve taken copyright liberties in reproducing these observations from his weekly eletter, The Zweig ENews.

Mark Zweig
Mark Zweig

Now in my 36th year of this business, I am still learning. Here are some quick bits of advice that have helped me over the years:

  1. Never lose your temper. Being calm is always best. But if you do, say you’re sorry. And mean it!
  2. If something goes wrong on a project, eat it. Don’t try to fight doing what you know you need to do and will do anyway. The sooner you get to fixing the problem, the better.
  3. Don’t ignore HR problems. They will just get worse. Deal with them head-on, sooner rather than later.
  4. A productive team member is far better than a destructive “star.” A destructive star may do the work of two or three people but run off 10 or 20. You can’t let that happen.
  5. The best time to sell is when you don’t need the work. You’ll be more honest with the client and more confident. That will lead to a better fee and relationship.
  6. There’s always something to fix in every business. But you can’t let that make you negative and cynical. Negative, cynical people are not ultimately successful.
  7. Focus on building your strengths versus trying to fix every weakness. It’s always good to figure out what you like to do and are best at. Do more of that and less of what you aren’t so good at.
  8. Long-term relationships are worth investing in. It’s easy to be seduced by a brighter smile or lower price but it takes a long time to build a relationship with a subconsultant or supplier. Don’t cast those aside quickly – especially for those you know have good intentions.
  9. Do as I do, not as I say, is always best if you’re the boss. Set a good example. Don’t be above any job. Demonstrate your competence in the basic work to be done. Pitch in and help out.
  10. Don’t create your own trap. It’s good to be good at doing stuff but not if you are so good that no one else can come close to meeting your standard. You’ll never get away from anything if that’s the way you operate. Trust the other guy to perform.
  11. There’s some truth to every rumor. Where there’s smoke, there’s fire. Investigate and find out what is really going on with your clients, subs, and employees, because it could affect you.
  12. Take care of your people. They aren’t easily replaced. Loyalty and care for the business should be rewarded.

Mark Zweig can be reached at mzweig@zweiggroup.com.

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