ConstructionPro Network blog: Diverse, high-level information to help make better project management decisions

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construction pro network blog
The Construction Pro Network blog provides a diversity of high-level content.
construction pro network blog
The ConstructionPro Network blog provides a diversity of high-level content.

WPL Publishing Inc.’s  ConstructionPro Network blog takes business seriously, and in the process, provides some really useful tools (and warnings) for contractors and professional services concerned about contract and project management, disputes, and best practices within the industry.

The free (and openly accessible) blog provides an entry point for a $395 per year annual information service, well worth the money for people who need to drill down into the more complex and challenging specialized project/risk management responsibilities.

Consider this recent blog posting by Bruce Jervis:

Can Support Services Be Recovered as Extra Administrative Costs?

Generally, the cost of administering a contract is built into the fixed contract price. It is part of the contractor’s general and administrative overhead. Sometimes, however, government demands can necessitate extraordinary efforts by a contractor. In those cases, the cost of legal, accounting and consultant services are recoverable as extra work in the administration of a contract.

A recent example is a project in which flaws in the government design necessitated substantial revisions of the contract drawings. The government asked the contractor to prepare an itemized request for an equitable price adjustment. The government was not happy with the requested amount and demanded a DCAA audit, forcing the contractor to pay for even more accounting services.

The contractor was awarded some of its accounting costs. The amount was greatly reduced from the contractor’s request, however. The written consultant agreement did not cover the full scope of work, the consultant’s billing statements were vague, and there were no written work products to corroborate some of the billed tasks.

Do you agree that consultant costs necessitated by government mismanagement of a project should be recoverable as extra costs of contract administration? Or, should these costs be anticipated and factored into the G & A rate? If the costs are to be allowable, are the stringent standards of proof mandated by the Federal Acquisition Regulation appropriate? Your comments are welcomed.

In another post, the blog shares a video of a dump truck that can “travel in water, snow and mud, and the truck bed swivels, helping the truck get into position with minimal maneuvering.”

I think readers will discover this blog combines a solid seriousness with an incredibly deep and diverse level of information. It isn’t superficial, that is for sure.

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